2015/2016 - Fort Lewis College

Fall Semester (2015)
  • ENGR 104: Engineering Fundamentals II [Instructor]
    • A course in engineering problem solving, including the study of engineering fundamentals using the concepts of computer programming. Algorithm development, repetitive operations, decision making, and evaluation of alternative courses of action in using computational/numerical programming is emphasized. Programming concepts are presented in a language-independent manner and implemented on a variety of engineering appropriate platforms.
  • ENGR 321: Introduction to Fluid Mechanics [Instructor]
    • Fluid properties, statics, kinematics and kinetics of fluids including gravitational and viscous effects; Differential analysis of fluid motion; Incompressible inviscid flow, dimensional analysis and similitude; Flow measurements, boundary layers, flow about immersed bodies and flow in open channels. Includes engineering design applications.
  • ENGR 496: Senior Design Capstone [Instructor]
    • Students experience the integration of technical knowledge through an open-ended, comprehensive design project which simulates an engineering project environment, including design, building or simulations, testing and verifications, project management, oral and written reports, and professional ethics. Students are required to take the Fundamentals of Engineering exam.

2014/2015 - Fort Lewis College

Spring Semester (2015)
  • ENGR 104: Engineering Fundamentals II [Instructor]
    • A course in engineering problem solving, including the study of engineering fundamentals using the concepts of computer programming. Algorithm development, repetitive operations, decision making, and evaluation of alternative courses of action in using computational/numerical programming is emphasized. Programming concepts are presented in a language-independent manner and implemented on a variety of engineering appropriate platforms. 
  • ENGR 336: Systems and Control [Instructor]
    • This course introduces you to the theory and practice of control systems engineering. The course introduces system modeling principles for mechanical, electrical and electromechanical systems, using the Laplace transform to build transfer-function models of system components. The course emphasizes the practical application of control theory to the analysis and design of feedback systems to ensure stability, reduce steady state errors and improve transient response.
  • ENGR 497: Senior Design Capstone [Instructor]
    • Students experience the integration of technical knowledge through an open-ended, comprehensive design project which simulates an engineering project environment, including design, building or simulations, testing and verifications, project management, oral and written reports, and professional ethics. Students are required to take the Fundamentals of Engineering exam.
Fall Semester (2014)
  • ENGR 104: Engineering Fundamentals II [Instructor]
    • A course in engineering problem solving, including the study of engineering fundamentals using the concepts of computer programming. Algorithm development, repetitive operations, decision making, and evaluation of alternative courses of action in using computational/numerical programming is emphasized. Programming concepts are presented in a language-independent manner and implemented on a variety of engineering appropriate platforms.
  • ENGR 271: Measurement and Instrumentation Laboratory [Instructor]
    • Introduction to measurement theory and techniques. Topics include measurement systems terminology (accuracy, precision, resolution, uncertainty, and calibration), graphical and analytical interpretation of data, curve fitting, statistical methods, systematic error analysis, and dynamic response of measurement systems. Laboratory experiments include measurement of flow, temperature, displacement, dimensions, angular velocity, pressure and strain.
  • ENGR 321: Introduction to Fluid Mechanics [Instructor]
    • Fluid properties, statics, kinematics and kinetics of fluids including gravitational and viscous effects; Differential analysis of fluid motion; Incompressible inviscid flow, dimensional analysis and similitude; Flow measurements, boundary layers, flow about immersed bodies and flow in open channels. Includes engineering design applications.
  • ENGR 496: Senior Design Capstone [Instructor]
    • Students experience the integration of technical knowledge through an open-ended, comprehensive design project which simulates an engineering project environment, including design, building or simulations, testing and verifications, project management, oral and written reports, and professional ethics. Students are required to take the Fundamentals of Engineering exam.

2013/2014 - Fort Lewis College

Spring Semester (2014)
  • ENGR 315: Engineering Design and Practice [Instructor]
    • Students study the engineering design process and complete one or more design projects.  The course is intended to show how engineers integrate technical knowledge with design concepts, teamwork, economics, project management, oral and written communications.  Ethics and professionalism in engineering are also explored.
  • ENGR 336: Systems and Control [Instructor]
    • This course introduces you to the theory and practice of control systems engineering. The course introduces system modeling principles for mechanical, electrical and electromechanical systems, using the Laplace transform to build transfer-function models of system components. The course emphasizes the practical application of control theory to the analysis and design of feedback systems to ensure stability, reduce steady state errors and improve transient response.
  • ENGR 497: Senior Design Capstone [Instructor]
    • Students experience the integration of technical knowledge through an open-ended, comprehensive design project which simulates an engineering project environment, including design, building or simulations, testing and verifications, project management, oral and written reports, and professional ethics. Students are required to take the Fundamentals of Engineering exam.
Fall Semester (2013)
  • ENGR 271: Measurement and Instrumentation Laboratory [Instructor]
    • Introduction to measurement theory and techniques. Topics include measurement systems terminology (accuracy, precision, resolution, uncertainty, and calibration), graphical and analytical interpretation of data, curve fitting, statistical methods, systematic error analysis, and dynamic response of measurement systems. Laboratory experiments include measurement of flow, temperature, displacement, dimensions, angular velocity, pressure and strain.
  • ENGR 321: Introduction to Fluid Mechanics [Instructor]
    • Fluid properties, statics, kinematics and kinetics of fluids including gravitational and viscous effects; Differential analysis of fluid motion; Incompressible inviscid flow, dimensional analysis and similitude; Flow measurements, boundary layers, flow about immersed bodies and flow in open channels. Includes engineering design applications.
  • ENGR 496: Senior Design Capstone [Instructor]
    • Students experience the integration of technical knowledge through an open-ended, comprehensive design project which simulates an engineering project environment, including design, building or simulations, testing and verifications, project management, oral and written reports, and professional ethics. Students are required to take the Fundamentals of Engineering exam.

2013 - Queensland University of Technology

Semester 1
  • ENB 301: Instrumentation and Control [Unit Coordinator]
    • This unit introduces the formal techniques that underpin all of modern control systems engineering. The aim is to demonstrate the application of control systems engineering theory, modeling simple dynamic systems, and the design of feedback control systems.
  • BEB 801/802: Capstone Project [Lecturer]
    • This unit exposes students to a set of integrated activities, each building upon the preceding, and culminating in a 'completed' project. Students apply skills and knowledge attained throughout their university study, and develop new abilities for application, to a real-world problem, industry based or research based, to simulate the design, development and management of a project solution.

2012 - Queensland University of Technology

Semester 1
  • ENB 301: Instrumentation and Control [Unit Coordinator]
    • This unit introduces the formal techniques that underpin all of modern control systems engineering. The aim is to demonstrate the application of control systems engineering theory, modeling simple dynamic systems, and the design of feedback control systems.
  • ENB 100: Engineering and Sustainability [Tutor] 
    • The unit aims to develop the professional skills and capabilities at an introductory level in the context of sustainable engineering.
  • BEB 801: Capstone Project [Lecturer]
    • This unit exposes students to a set of integrated activities, each building upon the preceding, and culminating in a 'completed' project. Students apply skills and knowledge attained throughout their university study, and develop new abilities for application, to a real-world problem, industry based or research based, to simulate the design, development and management of a project solution.
Semester 2
  • ENB 243: Linear Circuits and Systems [Unit Coordinator]
    • The aim of this unit is to develop skills to analyse physical systems using linear analysis techniques, to characterise these systems and to apply these techniques in particular to electrical circuits for filtering and signal conditioning applications. This unit focuses on 1. Complex frequency domain (Laplace) analysis techniques and characteristics, 2. Linear systems analysis and characteristics, 3. Operational amplifiers and active filters, and 4. Circuits and applications
  • ENB 580: Automated Control Systems [Unit Coordinator] 
    • The aim of this unit is to cover advanced topics in modern control systems engineering and will cover discrete time and state space control system design and analysis, as well as optimal control using Linear Quadratic methods. The theory is applied to the practical implementation of these control strategies.
  • BEB 802: Capstone Project [Lecturer]
    • This unit exposes students to a set of integrated activities, each building upon the preceding, and culminating in a 'completed' project. Students apply skills and knowledge attained throughout their university study, and develop new abilities for application, to a real-world problem, industry based or research based, to simulate the design, development and management of a project solution.

2011 - Queensland University of Technology

Semester 1
  • ENB 301: Instrumentation and Control [Unit Coordinator]
    • The aim of this unit is to provide the fundamentals of measurement techniques and the implementation and design of feedback control systems. Students are expected to apply the concepts of accuracy, precision, mean and standard deviation in designing and taking measurements; analyse feedback control systems in terms of stability and time domain performance; and design lead, lag, P, PI, PD, and PID compensators using root locus and bode techniques.
  • BEB 801: Capstone Project [Lecturer]
    • This unit exposes students to a set of integrated activities, each building upon the preceding, and culminating in a 'completed' project. Students apply skills and knowledge attained throughout their university study, and develop new abilities for application, to a real-world problem, industry based or research based, to simulate the design, development and management of a project solution.
Semester 2
  • ENB 347: Modern Flight Control Systems [Lecturer]
    • This unit introduces students to the application of classical and modern control theory to aircraft autopilot design. The use of modern control techniques, specifically state space and discrete time techniques, are applied in distinct aerospace applications. The students will gain practical experience in the implementation of these control techniques, and increase their appreciation for the use of testing and simulation in the design of flight control systems.
  • ENB 458: Modern Control Systems [Lecturer]
    • The aim of this unit is to introduce discrete-time and state space control system design and analysis, as well as optimal control in the LQ sense, including the practical implementation of such control strategies.
  • ENN 580: Control Systems [Lecturer]
    • This unit aims to develop the knowledge, understanding and skills associated with feedback control of non-linear and time-varying systems.
  • BEB 802: Capstone Project [Lecturer]
    • This unit exposes students to a set of integrated activities, each building upon the preceding, and culminating in a 'completed' project. Students apply skills and knowledge attained throughout their university study, and develop new abilities for application, to a real-world problem, industry based or research based, to simulate the design, development and management of a project solution.

2010 - University of Southern California

Spring Semester
  • Differential Geometry for Mechanical Systems [Instructor]
    • Weekly seminar course for graduate students covering a range of differential geometric topics related to control theory and mechanical systems. Topics covered in the course include manifolds, tangent and cotangent bundles, inverse function theorem, submanifolds, mappings on high dimensional spaces, connections, vector fields, tensor fields, Lie Groups, Lie algebras and differential forms. The seminar is application oriented, with the goal of providing students with a basic mathematical foundation and necessary tools to set-up and analyze linear and nonlinear mechanical systems. Specific applications for aquatic robots are used as examples and to motivate concepts.

2009 - University of Southern California

Fall Semester
  • Sensing and Planning in Robotics [Guest Lecturer]
    • This class focuses on modern techniques, based largely on probability theory, to solve problems in mobile robotics. A running theme throughout the class is that robotics involves uncertainty at several different levels. The machinery of estimation theory and probability theory (Bayes filters), has been applied with great success to cope with uncertainty in sensing and actuation. The class covers the relevant theory and applications to problems in robot localization, mapping, exploration, tracking, etc.

Prior to 2009 - University of Hawai`i at Manoa

Spring Semester 2008
  • Calculus of Variations  [Guest Lecturer]
    • Presented a lecture on applications of the calculus of variations to the fields of robotics and engineering.
    • The scope of the class covers topics on simple variational problems, first and second variation formulas, Euler-Lagrange equations, direct methods and optimal control
Fall Semester 2006
  • Pre-Calculus [Instructor]
    • Two sections, 20 students per section.
    • Functions, with special attention to polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions, plane trigonometry, polar coordinates, conic sections.
Spring Semester 2004 - Spring Semester 2006
  • Math 100 Honors [Instructor]
    • One section, 10 students per section.
    • Further details on topics from Math 100 class and additional material on mathematical reasoning and logic.
  • Math 100 [Teaching Assistant]
    • Two sections, 350 students per section.
    • Selected topics designed to acquaint nonspecialists with examples of mathematical reasoning.
Fall Semester 2001 - Fall Semester 2002
  • Math 242L Calculus II Computer Lab [Instructor]
    • Two sections, 30 students per section.
    • Integration techniques and applications, series and approximations, differential equations. Two classes per week for each section.
Spring Semester 2001
  • Calculus I [Instructor]
    • One section, 26 students.
    • Four classes per week.
    • Basic concepts; differentiation with applications; integration.
Fall Semester 2000
  • Applied Calculus I [Teaching Assistant]
    • Two sections, 20 students per section.
    • Graded homework, quizzes and exams. Held one one-hour recitation class per section each week.
    • Basic concepts; differentiation, differential equations and integration with applications directed primarily to the life sciences.
Summer 2000
  • Math 100 [Instructor]
    • One section, 26 students.
    • Five classes per week.
    • Survey of Mathematics course. Selected topics designed to acquaint nonspecialists with examples of mathematical reasoning.
Spring Semester 2000
  • Calculus I Lab [Teaching Assistant]
    • Two sections, 30 students per section.
    • Two one-hour recitation classes per week for each section. Graded homework, quizzes and exams.
    • Basic concepts; differentiation with applications; integration.
Fall Semester 1999
  • Precalculus [Teaching Assistant]
    • Two one-hour recitation classes each week, 20 students per section.
    • Functions, with special attention to polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions, plane trigonometry, polar coordinates, conic sections.

Please refer to my CV for further details on teaching and experience prior to 1999.